Chris Gayle Vs Fairfax Media

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                     CWC 2015, Leanne Russell, a squad massage therapist, reported that Mr. Gayle had misappropriated himself and made a proposal to her. She contacted Fairfax Press publication with a request when the cricketer had contentiously addressed a female journalist. Fairfax Press published the article with a variety of several other news organizations to follow up the narrative.

A minimum of twenty-eight releases linked to the reported event were printed in 5 different issued reports by 3 publishers in printed and digital versions, in a span of five days.

Throughout the court process, Ms. Russell, who had initially stayed unidentified, spoke about the event, although Mr. Gayle steadfastly claimed that it had never actually occurred. Evidently, a colleague who had been in the hall at the moment of the event spoke to support Gayle.

The judge convicted that there had been contradictions in Leanne’s argument and that Fairfax had not proven that there had been serious proof that the allegations were valid. The newspaper had to prove that, under the context, their actions were rational.

Judge Lucy McCallum apologized to the jurors when deliberating on some comments provided to the court regarding the facts in the summary.

Instead of dismissing the court, throughout a 6-day libel hearing in the SC of Justice, Fairfax acknowledged that the stories written in the “Sydney Morning Herald”, “The Canberra Times” and the “Age” were defamatory but pleaded for protection of facts and eligible right.

The 4-persons panel, composed of one male and three females, convened after recess to reconsider their decision as McCallum clarified their job was just to examine the facts at play and nothing more.

Gayle and his team member Smith were both present at the time of the incident. Smith gave evidence before the judge during the legal proceeding in favor of Chris Gayle and provided substantial evidence against the claim.

The Trial judge denied the petition of the Fairfax news organization and the appeal of Mr. Gayle, who tried to raise the sum of compensation. The publication withdrew the lawsuit for damages payout of three-hundred thousand pounds to Mr. Gayle, who was falsely blamed for revealing.

Opinion

Both sides of the story might be correct. Chris Gayle is a famous cricketer, so the masseuse may have tried to pull off a publicity stunt. She could be truthful too and Gayle, using his influence, could have forcefully converted the decision in his favor.

Result

The Trial judge denied the petition of the Fairfax news organization and the appeal of Mr. Gayle, who tried to raise the sum of compensation. The publication withdrew the lawsuit for a damages payout of three-hundred thousand pounds to Mr. Gayle, who was falsely blamed for revealing.

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